17 3 / 2014

The point is that there’s a trade-off between vividness and scalability. Narrative accounts of individual news events can be informative and pleasurable to read, and they can have a lot of intrinsic value whether or not they reveal some larger truth. But it can be extraordinarily hard to make generalizations about news events unless you stop to classify their most essential details according to some numbering or ordering system, turning anecdote into data.

The point is that there’s a trade-off between vividness and scalability. Narrative accounts of individual news events can be informative and pleasurable to read, and they can have a lot of intrinsic value whether or not they reveal some larger truth. But it can be extraordinarily hard to make generalizations about news events unless you stop to classify their most essential details according to some numbering or ordering system, turning anecdote into data.

25 2 / 2014

Why Marketers Are Now In The Entertainment Business

In digital entertainment industries like music, film, book publishing and TV, fewer and fewer hits are increasingly responsible for the vast majority of revenue

And this growing trend of a concentration of hits at the head of the long tail is only increasing year over year. According to Eric Schmidt of Google, “While the tail is very interesting, the vast majority of revenue remains in the head.”

Here’s but one example: “According to Nielsen SoundScan, of the 8MM unique digital tracks sold in 2011, 94% sold fewer than 100 units, and an astonishing 32% sold only one copy. In that same year, 102 tracks sold more than 1MM units each, accounting for 15% all sales.”

As part of this trend over the last 5-10 years, entertainment companies have begun to adopt “blockbuster strategies” that direct a disproportionate amount of investment toward a select few titles in the hopes that those will bring in the majority of sales and profit — as opposed to equally dividing marketing and production resources across all products. Furthermore, audiences are using social norms and popularity as a filter for what they consume, which creates a reinforcing effect for this strategy.

Read the Rest of My Article Here at MarketingLand: Why Marketers Are Now In The Entertainment Business

Why Marketers Are Now In The Entertainment Business

In digital entertainment industries like music, film, book publishing and TV, fewer and fewer hits are increasingly responsible for the vast majority of revenue

And this growing trend of a concentration of hits at the head of the long tail is only increasing year over year. According to Eric Schmidt of Google, “While the tail is very interesting, the vast majority of revenue remains in the head.”

Here’s but one example: “According to Nielsen SoundScan, of the 8MM unique digital tracks sold in 2011, 94% sold fewer than 100 units, and an astonishing 32% sold only one copy. In that same year, 102 tracks sold more than 1MM units each, accounting for 15% all sales.”

As part of this trend over the last 5-10 years, entertainment companies have begun to adopt “blockbuster strategies” that direct a disproportionate amount of investment toward a select few titles in the hopes that those will bring in the majority of sales and profit — as opposed to equally dividing marketing and production resources across all products. Furthermore, audiences are using social norms and popularity as a filter for what they consume, which creates a reinforcing effect for this strategy.

Read the Rest of My Article Here at MarketingLand: Why Marketers Are Now In The Entertainment Business

15 1 / 2014

"Rather than dividing its resources evenly across the products in its portfolio, a movie studio following a blockbuster strategy allocates a disproportionately large share of its production and marketing dollars to a small subset of products in the hope that they will bring in the lion’s share of revenues and profits."

-Blockbusters:  Hit Making, Risk Taking, and the Big Business of Entertainment

"Rather than dividing its resources evenly across the products in its portfolio, a movie studio following a blockbuster strategy allocates a disproportionately large share of its production and marketing dollars to a small subset of products in the hope that they will bring in the lion’s share of revenues and profits."

-Blockbusters: Hit Making, Risk Taking, and the Big Business of Entertainment

07 1 / 2014

"The antidote I’ve found for this is to write for only two people. First, write for yourself, both your present self whose thinking will be clarified by distilling an idea through writing and editing, and your future self who will be able to look back on these words and be reminded of the context in which they were written. Second, write for a single person who you have in mind as the perfect person to read what you write, almost like a letter, even if they never will, or a person who you’re sure will read it because of a connection you have to them (hi Mom!). Even on my moblog I have a frequent commenter who I’ll often keep in mind when posting a photo, curious to see her reaction."

05 1 / 2014

“What I Hope for You.” That you look for the question, not the solution. That you are not seduced by speed and power. That you don’t see the world as a market, but rather as a place that people live in — you are designing for people — not machines. (via Red Burns’s Plan to Serve Humanity Through Technology | The Lives They Lived | The New York Times Magazine)

“What I Hope for You.” That you look for the question, not the solution. That you are not seduced by speed and power. That you don’t see the world as a market, but rather as a place that people live in — you are designing for people — not machines. (via Red Burns’s Plan to Serve Humanity Through Technology | The Lives They Lived | The New York Times Magazine)

22 8 / 2013

"From branded entertainment and social media conversations to searchable information online, the future of media will revolve around content in its many shapes and forms. The successful marketers will be those who find creative ways to use it through media."

20 8 / 2013

Marketers are now in the business of making media. By definition, they create a media product and publish or broadcast it out to attract and engage an audience. The medium they choose to publish in defines their message. But, there’s a shift of power happening with that one-to-many broadcast model — one in which the content consumers have gone from passive readers to active participants.

Dan Gillmor refers to consumers of online content as “the former audience.” And some of the smartest minds in digital media — Evan Williams and Biz Stone, Nick Denton, The New York Times, and more — are working on new publishing tools and systems that embrace and facilitate the idea that the audience is no longer on the sidelines — they are playing in the game.

Read the rest of the article at MarketingLand

23 7 / 2013

There’s a great expression sometimes used in business: “A camel is a horse designed by committee.” I don’t have anything against camels, but I do agree with the underlying sentiment: well-intentioned content and advertising campaigns can go awry when the companies executing them have lost sight of their original purpose.

A recent interview with some of the most successful content creators on YouTube illustrates this point. When asked what the formula was for successfully growing an audience, they explained that they “simply made content that they personally liked and wanted to share with the rest of the world.”
 
Read my full post here at MarketingLand:  Publish With Passion: Let Your Content Find An Audience

There’s a great expression sometimes used in business: “A camel is a horse designed by committee.” I don’t have anything against camels, but I do agree with the underlying sentiment: well-intentioned content and advertising campaigns can go awry when the companies executing them have lost sight of their original purpose.

A recent interview with some of the most successful content creators on YouTube illustrates this point. When asked what the formula was for successfully growing an audience, they explained that they “simply made content that they personally liked and wanted to share with the rest of the world.”

 

Read my full post here at MarketingLand:  Publish With Passion: Let Your Content Find An Audience

15 7 / 2013

08 7 / 2013

Research found four out of five consumers would be more inclined to buy a brand more often in the future after being exposed to its social media presence, while 83% of consumers exposed to social media said they would trial a brand’s product. (via Social media provides a 3:1 return on investment, claims IAB study | Marketing Magazine)

Research found four out of five consumers would be more inclined to buy a brand more often in the future after being exposed to its social media presence, while 83% of consumers exposed to social media said they would trial a brand’s product. (via Social media provides a 3:1 return on investment, claims IAB study | Marketing Magazine)

25 6 / 2013

 ”Many of Nature’s finest lessons are to be found in her storms, and if careful to keep in right relations with them, we may go safely abroad with them, rejoicing in the grandeur and beauty of their works and ways” (Stickeen: The Story of a Dog, by John Muir (1909))

 ”Many of Nature’s finest lessons are to be found in her storms, and if careful to keep in right relations with them, we may go safely abroad with them, rejoicing in the grandeur and beauty of their works and ways” (Stickeen: The Story of a Dog, by John Muir (1909))

23 6 / 2013

16 6 / 2013

"

“Slow media is like slow food. It’s not about fast consumption but about choosing the ingredients mindfully and preparing them in a concentrated manner.”

The tenets of Slow Media stress quality and respect, timelessness and progressiveness (as opposed to being reactionary). Rather than being a contradiction to Twitter and blogs, Slow Media is about finding a way to use them.”

"

02 6 / 2013

Plimpton was a participatory journalist and collector of experiences #gonzo

 (via Plimpton Movie)

Plimpton was a participatory journalist and collector of experiences #gonzo

(via Plimpton Movie)

31 5 / 2013